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Matching a single data unit

 

 

 

Outside a character class, the escape sequence \C matches any one data unit, whether or not a UTF mode is set. In the 8-bit library, one data unit is one byte; in the 16-bit library it is a 16-bit unit; in the 32-bit library it is a 32-bit unit. Unlike a dot, \C always matches line-ending characters. The feature is provided in Perl in order to match individual bytes in UTF-8 mode, but it is unclear how it can usefully be used. Because \C breaks up characters into individual data units, matching one unit with \C in a UTF mode means that the rest of the string may start with a malformed UTF character. This has undefined results, because PCRE assumes that it is dealing with valid UTF strings (and by default it checks this at the start of processing unless the PCRE_NO_UTF8_CHECK, PCRE_NO_UTF16_CHECK or PCRE_NO_UTF32_CHECK option is used).

 

PCRE does not allow \C to appear in lookbehind assertions (described below) in a UTF mode, because this would make it impossible to calculate the length of the lookbehind.

 

In general, the \C escape sequence is best avoided. However, one way of using it that avoids the problem of malformed UTF characters is to use a lookahead to check the length of the next character, as in this pattern, which could be used with a UTF-8 string (ignore white space and line breaks):

 

  (?| (?=[\x00-\x7f])(\C) |

      (?=[\x80-\x{7ff}])(\C)(\C) |

      (?=[\x{800}-\x{ffff}])(\C)(\C)(\C) |

      (?=[\x{10000}-\x{1fffff}])(\C)(\C)(\C)(\C))

 

A group that starts with (?| resets the capturing parentheses numbers in each alternative (see "Duplicate Subpattern Numbers" below). The assertions at the start of each branch check the next UTF-8 character for values whose encoding uses 1, 2, 3, or 4 bytes, respectively. The character's individual bytes are then captured by the appropriate number of groups.



 


 

Philip Hazel

University Computing Service

Cambridge CB2 3QH, England.

Last updated: 12 November 2013

Copyright © 1997-2013 University of Cambridge.


 


 

 

 

 

 

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